Crib maker Baby’s Dream shutters

Last updated: Nov 9, 2017 @ 7:48 pm (Buena Vista, GA) Georgia-based crib manufacturer Baby’s Dream has closed, BabyBargains.com has learned.

Baby’s Dream ended a 27-year run as a family-owned maker of cribs earlier this year, when the company quietly closed its doors. While there was no formal announcement, two former Baby’s Dream retail dealers confirmed the company stopped production in mid 2017. Unfortunately, several retailers reported that they company left unfilled orders for conversion rails—customers need these rails to convert Baby’s Dream crib into full-size beds.

Baby’s Dream web site is now down; the last post to Baby’s Dream’s Facebook page was July 14. Baby’s Dream Twitter feed shows its last post in December 2016.

Baby’s Dream was among the first crib makers to commercialize convertible cribs (called Crib4Life), cribs that converted to full-size beds once a baby outgrew a crib. Baby’s Dream cribs were designed with headboards and footboards that would morph into adult beds (with conversion rails).

Based outside Atlanta in Buena Vista, Georgia, Baby’s Dream was sold almost exclusively in juvenile specialty stores—and that probably contributed to its demise. The number of independent retail baby stores has declined sharply in recent years, beset by competition from Amazon and chain stores like Buy Buy Baby. Former Baby’s Dream retailers like Great Beginnings in Maryland and Goore’s in Sacramento were among a wave of indie baby stores that closed in the 2010’s. Other furniture makers like glider-rocker maker Little Castle have shuttered in 2017 as well.

Baby’s Dream also suffered from various production woes and customer service snafus. In the mid 2000’s, Baby’s Dream moved production of their furniture to Chile—only to have its plant destroyed by not one but two separate fires in 2007. The resulting delivery delays meant some customer had to wait up to 24 weeks for furniture, which further damaged Baby’s Dream reputation. A 2010 earthquake in Chile caused more production delays.

In 2015, Baby’s Dream suffered another black eye when the company recalled 4600 cribs for lead paint. In our last review of Baby’s Dream in 2016, we documented several customer service snafus that angered parents.

Unlike other crib brands that embraced ecommerce by selling cribs on Amazon and Target, Baby’s Dream only sold its wares on its own web site.

If you are looking for conversion rails or spare parts for a Baby’s Dream, we have bad news: you are out of luck. Several customers have reached out to Baby’s Dream Facebook page to get crib hardware, but have received no reply. If you come up with a solution, please post to the comments below for others to share.